Bamboo Teepee Meets Fibonacci

by - February 28, 2011

At the end of last week, the gusty winds blew over our teepee. The Man decided that I needed the help of concrete (while he was installing fence posts), and we erected one lone bamboo pole to serve as a cornerstone of sorts for the boys' future teepee. My best friend, Bear, was over, and in her great design wisdom suggested we do a Fibonacci teepee. A whuh? I hadn't heard of that concept since high school math, or was it Latin class... It involved spirals. I remember there being a golden rectangle involved as well.

The new construction is a quarter-teepee or a "teebonacci" with the poles attached around the vertical in a spiral. The angle of the teebonacci is set so that the shading will be done from morning until the early afternoon, and the vines will benefit from the sun during those times as well. This leaves two open sides, one for the entrance and one so they can spy on the street from behind the fence once the pickets are installed.


I dug up the old pathway and laid the bricks out to give them a little patio to play on. Under the old pathway, fire ants had already staked out their territory, so next on my agenda is "treating fire ants in the vegetable garden." With the garden gongs relocated to the teebonacci and branches woven through the bamboo, this hut already has some play-appeal even without the greenery.

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7 comments

  1. TheconservatorygirlFebruary 28, 2011 at 2:42 PM

    I love how you wove the branches in there! It looks like those sculptures that used to be on State's campus that were all made out of green limbs.

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  2. Love it! You found some huge bamboo. I've already staked out a location source for some, but still need to cut it. We haven't had as lovely weather to motivate gardening as you lucky Raleigh-ites.

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  3. We have some friends with a bamboo forest behind their house. I probably should have cut more, but I think this design will work great for us. Congrats on your pregnancy! I saw your FB post. I hope the summer treats you kindly as you wait :)

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  4. Dr. Will Hooker did those designs with his students. I love seeing the latest installations as I drive past the horticulture building.

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  5. Thanks Paige! I hope we have a long, cool spring!

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  6. Paige, you've inspired me to create a tunnel for Jonathan in an under-used section of my garden. I'm just using the metal pipe frame I built last year for two of my bean trellises and setting them up A-frame style. But I'm excited!! I'll post pics on my blog when I get it semi-finished!!

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  7. Awesome, Krista! I can't wait to see it.

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